The Third International Queer Death Studies Workshop “Death Matters: Death and Dying in a Queer Context”: the programme & registration!

Dear all,

It is our great pleasure to announce the programme of the upcoming Third International Queer Death Studies Workshop: Death Matters: Death and Dying in a Queer Context that takes place on 30th and 31st May 2018 at Linköping University. The workshop starts at 10:15 on 30th May and finishes at 16:00 on 31st May.

In order to register, please send an email to: tara.mehrabi [at] liu.se.

Registration DEADLINE: 23rd May 2018.

 

Programme:

30th May (Wednesday)

10:15 – 11:00 Introduction

11:00 – 12:30 Session I:

Margrit Shildrick (Stockholm University, SE/York University, Toronto, CA), Temporalities and Onto-epistemologies of Death and Dying

Natashe Lemos Dekker (University of Amsterdam/Leiden University, NL), Valuing Life: Normative and Moral Frames at the End of Life with Dementia

12:30 – 13:45 Lunch (on a self-paid basis)

13:45 – 15:55 Session II

Andria Nyberg Forshage & Eliot Eklöw (Södertörn University/Stockholm University, SE), Lilies of Sterile Pleasure. On Indolence, Deathliness, Deproduction, and Double Affirmation

ida Hillerup Hansen (Central European University, HU), ‘Falling Apart’: Prisms of Living with Loss

Magdalena Górska (Utrecht University, NL), Suffocations

15:55 – 16:10 Break (fika)

16:10 – 18:10 Session III

Órla O’Donovan (University College Cork, IE), Death, Dying and the ‘Commons’

Anne Bettina Pedersen (Aarhus University, DK), (Un)Making Sylvia Likens: Towards a Theory of Femicide Narratives

Saad Khan (independent researcher, BD), Dying Inside Black Mirror’s Posthumanist World

18:10 – 18:30 Discussion

19:30 – … Dinner downtown (on a self-paid basis)

 

31st May (Thursday)

10:15 – 11:45 Session IV

Agnieszka Kotwasińska (University of Warsaw, PL), Self/Haunted: Death and Mourning in Recent Horror Cinema

Line Henriksen (University of Copenhagen, DK) & Tara Mehrabi (Linköping University, SE), Hosts, Ghosts and Flies: Thinking Life, Death and Ethics through HBO’s West World

11:45 – 13:15 Lunch (on a a self-paid basis)

13:15 – 14:45 Session V

Alexandra Løvås Kristinnsdottir (University of Oslo, NO), Death Positivity and Its Potentials

Kristin Gupta (Rice University, US), Death (Feminist) Futures

14:45 – 15:00 Break (fika)

15:00 – 16:00 Final discussion

The 3rd International Queer Death Studies Workshop: the programme soon to be announced!

Dear all,
We have received a great number of fantastic paper proposals for The Third International QDS Workshop Death and Dying in a Queer Context, which has made the selection process extremely difficult (and a bit painful, too)!

But, in this connection, we’ve also decided to create an extra time slot and begin the event earlier, i.e. at 10:15 on 30th May.

This means that the workshop takes place on:
30th May from 10:15 – 18:00
and
31st May from 10:15 – 16:00.

We are trying to change the times in this FB event, but the edit option doesn’t seem to work. We’ll do our best to sort this out soon!

Deadline EXTENDED

Dear all,

Due to many requests we received, we have decided to extend the abstract deadline for The Third International Queer Death Studies Workshop until 18th March 2018. You can find more information on the workshop, including the CfP here, or in the pdf version here.

We hope that in this way those of you who would like to take active part in the workshop and haven’t managed to get in touch with us will now have a few more days to do so!

We are so much looking forward to hearing from you and to the workshop itself!

The Third International Queer Death Studies Workshop “Death Matters: Death and Dying in a Queer Context”, 30-31 May 2018 Linköping University, Sweden

CALL FOR PAPERS

3qds

Queer Death Studies Network (QDSN) was officially launched in November 2016 at the G16: Swedish National Gender Research Conference in Linköping and has been vividly developing since then. The network constitutes a space for researchers, students, artists, activists, and other practitioners who critically and (self) reflexively investigate and challenge conventional normativities, assumptions, expectations, and regimes of truths that are brought to life and made evident by death, dying, and mourning.

The conventional engagements with the questions of death, dying and mourning are insufficient and reductive: they are often governed by the normative notions of the subject; interhuman and human/nonhuman bonds; family relations and communities; rituals; and finally, experiences of grief, mourning, and bereavement.  Moreover, these engagements are often embedded in constraining beliefs in life/death divides, constructed along the lines of conventional religious and/or scientific mind/body dualisms.

Against this background, QDSN serves as a site for ‘queering’ traditional ways of approaching death both as a subject of study and philosophical reflection, and as a phenomenon to articulate in artistic work or practices of mourning. Here, the notion of ‘queer’ conveys many meanings. It refers to researching and narrating death, dying and mourning in the context of queer bonds and communities, where the subjects involved/studied/interviewed and the relations they are involved in are recognised as ‘queer’. Simultaneously, the term ‘queer’ can also function as an adverb and a verb, referring thus to the processes of going beyond and unsettling (subverting, exceeding) binaries and given norms, normativities, and constraining conventions. In other words, ‘queer’ becomes both a process and a methodology that is applicable and exceeds the focus on gender and sexuality as its exclusive concerns.

During our previous workshops we have focused on the ways queer theory and queer perspectives can help us rethink death, dying, remains, afterlife, mourning and the life-death dichotomy. In other words, we have explored what ‘queer’ means and, most importantly, what it does to the question of death in its multiple incarnations and avenues.

The upcoming workshop concentrates on the notions of ‘death’ and ‘dying’ as such. What do death and dying mean? What is the relationship between death and dying? How do death and dying matter (and materialise) beyond the normative structures constitutive of ontological, epistemological, ethical, legal, and conventional religious frames? What are and what can be the onto-epistemological, ethical, cultural and legal implications of rethinking death and dying through a queer(ing) lens? And, in turn, what does focusing on and rethinking of death and dying do to queer studies? What does it do to the cultural imaginaries and practices?

The workshop will consist of individual papers (20 min), arranged in panel sessions, followed by Q&A and joint discussions. We welcome submissions from both academics and non-academics, as the event aims to mobilise transversal dialogues on the theme. If you would like to present a paper at the workshop, please, send an abstract (max 300 words), accompanied by a short bio (up to 100 words) to: tara.mehrabi [at] liu.se. Deadline EXTENDED: 18 March 2018.

The event starts on 30th May at 10:15 and ends on 31st May at 16:00 in Linköping, Sweden.

Unfortunately, the workshop is organised on a very low budget, which means that we are not able to cover the travel and accommodation costs for the speakers.

The workshop is available to everyone and there is no participant fee.

We will provide participants with coffee/tea and snacks, but dinner and lunch will be on self-paid basis.

If you would like to take part in the workshop on these (self-paying) conditions and would like to apply for an external funding to cover the travel, food and accommodation costs, we will be most happy to provide you with an official invitation letter.

 

Official launch of Queer Death Studies Network

Queer Death Studies Network (QDSN) was officially launched in November 2016 at the G16: Swedish National Gender Research Conference in Linköping and has been vividly developing since then. The network constitutes a space for researchers, students, artists, activists, and other practitioners who critically and (self) reflexively investigate and challenge conventional normativities, assumptions, expectations, and regimes of truths that are brought to life and made evident by death, dying, and mourning.